Leadership Class 2: Take 2 – a better experience for you

Cohort 2 of the Straight Talk Leadership Experience Launched this week. I’ve had some great conversations with interested leaders. A few teams signing up right now. And this morning I had a realization (on how to make this better).

Let’s try this again.

Allow me a second chance to explain the program better and welcome some teams into the mix.

Let me explain.

Once the first Straight Talk Leadership Experience wrapped, I got to work. I wanted to get some free resources and key updates out to you, including:

As I started working on the second cohort, I got asked a lot of excellent questions. I worked on incorporating the lessons learned from the first class and answering questions. I wanted to make sure I made it easy to say yes and build the case to take the class. That included:

Based on demand, I figured out a program for teams. And it’s an offer for this cohort no reasonable leader can refuse. A way to foster individual learning while helping a team solve a pressing issue. Based on the response this week, it’s a needed program.

We kicked off the second class (class, cohort? What do you prefer?) this week, including:

  • A rebalanced approach that makes it easy for busy leaders to invest the time and get results
  • Insights and exercises applied to real work situations that professionals face daily
  • And the opportunity to prove the value you create working with me increases300%
  • A certificate/badge of completion you can display on your LinkedIn profile
  • A CPE certificate for 30 hours when you complete the class

Then I woke up this morning and realized I could do even better. While I designed this class for busy professionals, I wanted to add a more space into the approach.

What if we still worked as a class (cohort?) – but had more flexibility?

Sometimes we need to tackle the deadlines and opportunities that we didn’t see. Or maybe we need to work training and development around pre-scheduled activities. Stumble and miss a week… and then the 5 hours a week feels like a burden.

My goal is to help you get time back in your busy schedule. But I also wanted to make sure the approach keeps the class together.

A key exercise each week is the real, applied use of the Straight Talk Framework. Working on that together makes a world of difference. It’s a way for us to test what we think we know against the experience and insights of others.

Then I realized that with a bit more space:

  • We could tackle more challenges as a team
  • You’d get a few more group coaching sessions
  • And the blended experience would actually improve for everyone

It also gives us flexibility for the teams working through the program. It comes down to making sure that busy people get what they need to embrace the Straight Talk Framework and get results.

Everyone wins.

The instant improvement to the Straight Talk Leadership Experience:

Here are the changes:

  • The 6 training modules are now available over 8-10 weeks (we’ll feel it out together)
  • Group coaching sessions increase from 6 to 8-10; one per week
  • Each individual still gets 6 private coaching sessions to use at during the course
  • NEW – welcome coaching session; review your intention, value estimation, and baseline
  • NEW – best next step coaching session at the conclusion

Each week still starts with the practice of setting an intention. This guides the active and purposeful use of the Straight Talk Framework. And it gets you clarity of focus, priority of action, and confidence in your best next step.

Together we’ll focus on breaking down barriers, building up connections, and getting results. And you’ll have more time and support to do it.

Cohort 2, Take 2 – Let’s try this again

With the new approach, we have a few more days to welcome you into this program. I’m working to bring 3-5 teams into the program (and offering a deal that is hard to refuse). This allows us to prove the value of Straight Talk when applied to team challenges like:

  • Trying to get a stalled project on track and finished by the end of the year
  • Making the case to get budget and buy-in for an initiative
  • Working to figure out where to focus (I have a program for that)
  • It works for solution providers and sales teams
  • And is a solid way for new teams to come together and elevate their performance

With the new, more relaxed schedule, getting started by this Friday is ideal. In some cases, next week might work, too (provided there are seats left). Don’t miss out – join in and end the year strong.

What does that mean about future cohorts?

I know some of you have reached out to tell me you’ll like to take part in future classes. I look forward to working with you. I also want to be straight with you (do you expect any less?).

I’m taking this one class (cohort?) at a time.

Right now, I’m planning to offer another class next year. Maybe several. But that planning happens after the current class is successful and completed. I need to see how the expanded schedule works. And explore how to incorporate the team dynamic.

What about the price of future cohorts?

I tackled that in the discussion about the 300% value guarantee. The course is currently worth about $6,000. That’s not what I’m charging yet.  The leaders and teams investing in the course now get a discount because they help make it better.

What will the price be if I offer another cohort?

I’m not sure yet. I know I’ve thrown around different numbers. The reality is I won’t know until we get closer. The more dialed-in the experience, the higher the value, the larger the investment. Once I have the right examples, case studies, and testimonials, the investment goes up.

If I hold less cohorts, that’ll affect the price, too. If you’re trying to budget, plan on somewhere between $4,000 – $6,000. And rest easy knowing you’ll get a remarkable experience with a 300% value guarantee.

When you choose Straight Talk, you can’t go wrong. I guarantee it.

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